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The Strategic Implications of E-Network Integration and Transformation Paths for Synchronizing Supply Chains

The Strategic Implications of E-Network Integration and Transformation Paths for Synchronizing Supply Chains
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Author(s): Minjoon Jun (New Mexico State University, USA), Shaohan Cai (Carleton University, Canada) and Daesoo Kim (Korea University Business School, Korea)
Copyright: 2008
Volume: 1
Issue: 4
Pages: 21
Source title: International Journal of Information Systems and Supply Chain Management (IJISSCM)
Editor(s)-in-Chief: John Wang (Montclair State University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/jisscm.2008100103

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Abstract

Streamlining information flows across the physical supply chain is crucial for successful supply chain management. This study examines different structures of e-networks (i.e., virtual supply chains linked via electronic information and communication technologies) and their maximum capabilities to gain e-network benefits. Further, this research explores four levels of e-network integration based on a 2x2 e-network technology and transaction integration matrix. Of the four levels, an e-network with high e-technology/high e-transaction integration appears to be most desirable for the companies that aspire to achieve the maximum benefits from their IT investments. Finally, this study identifies three alternative transformation paths toward a powerful high e-technology/high e-transaction integration network and discusses strategic implications of selecting those paths, in terms of e-network structures, availability of financial and technical resources, supply chain members’ collaborative planning, e-security mechanisms, and supply chain size.

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