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Changes in Online Subjectivity: Artificial Users, Subject Fragmentarization, and Multimodal Interaction

Changes in Online Subjectivity: Artificial Users, Subject Fragmentarization, and Multimodal Interaction
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Author(s): Zdenek Smutny (University of Economics, Prague, Czech Republic) and Vaclav Janoscik (Academy of Performing Arts in Prague, Czech Republic)
Copyright: 2019
Pages: 20
Source title: Intimacy and Developing Personal Relationships in the Virtual World
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Rejani Thudalikunnil Gopalan (Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Hospital, India)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-4047-2.ch001

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Abstract

Human subjectivity is deeply affected by the environment as mediated by the Internet. As users within this environment, people are not only affected by their entrance into it, but their subjectivity evolves along with the trends of online networking. The subjectivity of people is affected by (their networking with) human and artificial users of the environment and the possibility of influencing user's subjectivity is also given by other specific aspects of the environment. This chapter focuses on three areas: artificial users, subject and its fragmentarization, and multimodal interaction. Findings in conceptualizing change in terms of subjectivity are based within the poststructuralist philosophical tradition. There is applied the phenomenon known as the “death of the author,” proclaimed in late 1960s, to the situation of the contemporary user to uncover changes in online subjectivity. The chapter also presents examples of implications of such changes at the level of interactions and distribution of messages and the role of artificial users in these processes within online marketing.

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