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Technology Trust in B2B Electronic Commerce: Conceptual Foundations

Technology Trust in B2B Electronic Commerce: Conceptual Foundations
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Author(s): Paul A. Pavlou (University of Southern California, USA) and Pauline Ratnasingam (University of Vermont, USA)
Copyright: 2003
Pages: 16
Source title: Business Strategies for Information Technology Management
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Kalle Kangas (Turku School of Economics and Business Administration, Finland)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-93177-745-2.ch014

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Abstract

A comprehensive conceptualization of trust in B2B electronic commerce should include trust in the infrastructure and the underlying control and support mechanisms. We refer to this new target of trust as “technology trust,” which is described as the subjective belief by which an organization assesses that the underlying technology infrastructure and support mechanisms are capable of supporting inter-organizational communications, transactions, and collaborations. We describe technology trust as a higher-order construct comprising of transaction (a) confidentiality, (b) integrity, (c) authentication, (d) non-repudiation, (e) access control, (f) availability, and (g) best business practices. We conceptualize technology trust drawing upon the notion of institutional trust, and particularly the dimension of situational normality. We describe how bi-lateral (dyadic) and third-party institutionalized technology-related practices can institute situational normality in B2B electronic commerce. This chapter contributes to the understanding of the conceptual foundations of technology trust by bridging the gap between technological solutions from an institutional trust perspective (technology trust), interorganizational trust, and value creation in B2B electronic commerce. We conclude by discussing the study’s theoretical and managerial implications toward instituting and making use of technology trust.

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