IRMA-International.org: Creator of Knowledge
Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Preparing Students to Run Projects: A Self Evaluation Mapping Our Current Curriculum to Needed Project Management Learning Outcomes

Preparing Students to Run Projects: A Self Evaluation Mapping Our Current Curriculum to Needed Project Management Learning Outcomes
View Free PDF
Author(s): Leslie Lorenze (Purdue University, USA) and Jeff Brewer (Purdue University, USA)
Copyright: 2005
Pages: 4
Source title: Managing Modern Organizations Through Information Technology
Source Editor(s): Mehdi Khosrow-Pour (Information Resources Management Association, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-822-2.ch143

Abstract

The statistics and statements below demonstrate that the demand for better trained project managers has greatly increased over the last several years and will continue to grow well into the future. • The U.S. Spends $2.3 trillion on projects every year, an amount equal to one-quarter of the nation’s gross domestic product. (Schwalbe, 2004) • The world as a whole spends nearly $10 trillion of its $40.7 trillion gross product on projects of all kinds. (Schwalbe, 2004) • More than half a million new information technology application development projects were initiated during 2001, up from 300,000 in 2000. (Standish Group, 2001) • A recent survey conducted at META Group’s 2003 conference of attending Project Managers indicated that 77% of respondents believe lack of project and program management skills is a major IT issue. (META Group, 2003) • On average, America spends over $275 billion each year on about 200,000 software development projects, many of which fail. (Crawford, 2002) As project management positions become more important, it has become critical for organizations to place individuals in a project management role that have the skills to be successful. This paper will examine this concept as well as the necessary skills needed by an IT project manager to succeed and will compare these skills to skills obtained from our Computer Technology (CPT) curriculum. A final analysis will be conducted to examine any gaps that exist and determine the courses and learning outcomes that need to be added to adequately equip our students with the skills they will need to be successful in an entry level project leader role.

Body Bottom