IRMA-International.org: Creator of Knowledge
Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Latinx Siblings' Social Emotional Support During Shared Reading

Latinx Siblings' Social Emotional Support During Shared Reading
View Sample PDF
Author(s): Tatiana Yasmeen Hill (Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, USA), Natalia Palacios (Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, USA), Melissa Lucas (Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, USA), Stephanie Dugan (Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, USA), Amanda K. Kibler (College of Education, Oregon State University, USA) and Judy Paulick (Curry School of Education and Human Development, University of Virginia, USA)
Copyright: 2020
Pages: 25
Source title: Handbook of Research on Advancing Language Equity Practices With Immigrant Communities
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Lourdes Cardozo-Gaibisso (Universidad ORT Uruguay, Uruguay) and Max Vazquez Dominguez (University of North Georgia, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-3448-9.ch011

Purchase

View Latinx Siblings' Social Emotional Support During Shared Reading on the publisher's website for pricing and purchasing information.

Abstract

In order to identify culturally adaptive approaches to socialization of school readiness skills involving siblings in Latinx families, researchers investigated how Latinx older siblings interact with younger siblings in the context of shared reading to support social emotional skills in three Latinx immigrant families. Analyses revealed that older siblings demonstrated socialization practices such as using commands or questions and using social cues, which appeared to foster focal children's engagement. Older siblings also modeled connecting to prior knowledge, problem solving, negotiation of roles, and asking for and providing help, which seemed to enable children's autonomous social participation. Importantly, practices co-occurred with warm and responsive interaction styles. Findings inform how Latinx immigrant families socialize emotional skills to accomplish early literacy tasks using practices that may be culturally specific and aligned with parental socialization.

Related Content

Esther S. Gross, Jenifer A. Crawford. © 2022. 22 pages.
Nancy Kwang Johnson, L. Erika Saito. © 2022. 23 pages.
Ekaterina Moore, Kimberly Ferrario. © 2022. 19 pages.
Emmy J. Min. © 2022. 22 pages.
Laura Loder Buechel. © 2022. 23 pages.
Alexa Yunes-Koch, Kara Mitchell Viesca, Claudia Yunes. © 2022. 24 pages.
Dawn Janke. © 2022. 26 pages.
Body Bottom