IRMA-International.org: Creator of Knowledge
Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

New Media and Gender in East Africa: Assessing Media Dependency and Public Attitudes

New Media and Gender in East Africa: Assessing Media Dependency and Public Attitudes
View Sample PDF
Author(s): Uche T. Onyebadi (Texas Christian University, USA) and Yusuf Kalyango (Ohio University, USA)
Copyright: 2011
Pages: 18
Source title: Cultural Identity and New Communication Technologies: Political, Ethnic and Ideological Implications
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): D. Ndirangu Wachanga (University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-591-9.ch006

Purchase

View New Media and Gender in East Africa: Assessing Media Dependency and Public Attitudes on the publisher's website for pricing and purchasing information.

Abstract

This study set out to ascertain the use of and dependency on new media technology for political communication by voting- age citizens of the three main East African countries, namely Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania. We learn the importance of new media communication opportunities towards the struggle for liberal democracy, which is demonstrated by the unanimity of respondents’ attitudes that their governments suppress political discourse. But the degree of use and dependence on these new media instruments are not uniform across the region. Gender and level of education are two salient factors that create these differences in the use of and dependency on new media technology for political communication in East Africa. But our findings have no bearing on the authenticity of the messages sent through these new media technological devices, or the extent of divisiveness or unity that such messages might engender among citizens in the region in times of political crises. Our primary contention is that such citizens now depend on these technological devices to serve their informational needs moreso when political and other forms of national emergency situations arise. This dependency phenomenon is partly the consequence of the existence of media laws enacted by governments in the region to hamstring mainstream media houses.

Related Content

Bonnie Beresford, Milica Vincent. © 2020. 24 pages.
Joe Monaco, Edward W. Schneider. © 2020. 17 pages.
Sreeja Sreenivasan Mattookkaran, Terri Mestre, Barbara Shortt, Florence Martin. © 2020. 16 pages.
Justin A. Sentz. © 2020. 22 pages.
Nancy Crain Burns, Gabriela Ziegler. © 2020. 29 pages.
Victoria Lynn Lowell, George Orren Hanshaw. © 2020. 16 pages.
Jesse Strycker. © 2020. 17 pages.
Body Bottom