IRMA-International.org: Creator of Knowledge
Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

The Rise, Decline, and Regeneration of Industrial Districts: Enhanced HRM, SMEs, and Location

The Rise, Decline, and Regeneration of Industrial Districts: Enhanced HRM, SMEs, and Location
View Sample PDF
Author(s): Stuart Holland (University of Coimbra, Portugal) and Teresa Carla Oliveira (University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Copyright: 2014
Pages: 42
Source title: Effective Human Resources Management in Small and Medium Enterprises: Global Perspectives
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Carolina Machado (University of Minho, Portugal) and Pedro Melo (University of Minho, Portugal)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-4731-2.ch013

Purchase

View The Rise, Decline, and Regeneration of Industrial Districts: Enhanced HRM, SMEs, and Location on the publisher's website for pricing and purchasing information.

Abstract

Who does what, and how, is central to Human Resource Management (HRM). Where people do it has been central to theories of location and the clustering of firms in industrial districts. Yet there has been little synergy boundary spanning between HRM and location theories. This chapter seeks to redress this in relation to the rise and decline of industrial districts of small and medium firms and to draw implications for their potential regeneration. It relates this to cost-based models of locational and competitive advantage, theories of flexible specialisation, the “triple helix” concept of enterprise-university-government relations, and the challenges both for entrepreneurs and for policy makers in an era in which industrial districts are no longer only local but already have “gone global.” In forwarding the concept of “enhanced HRM,” the chapter advocates that public policies for SMEs should encourage surfacing tacit knowledge in new product innovation, achieving kaizen style continuous improvement, stretching core competences, profiling and extending latent abilities and implicit skills, and boundary spanning to synergise research with new high-tech start ups. While critical both of Michael Porter’s dismissal of tacit knowledge and kaizen, and of European research and regional policies, the chapter gives examples of success in such policies and how “enhanced HRM” can draw from them to regenerate industrial districts.

Related Content

Robert G. Hamlin. © 2019. 29 pages.
Robert G. Hamlin, Darlene F. Russ-Eft. © 2019. 22 pages.
Wouter ten Have, Ernst Graamans, Steven ten Have. © 2019. 24 pages.
Karen E. Watkins, Victoria J. Marsick, Ilene Wasserman. © 2019. 17 pages.
Joan Ernst van Aken. © 2019. 18 pages.
Robert Garvey. © 2019. 29 pages.
Maria Cseh, Beatriz Coningham. © 2019. 15 pages.
Body Bottom