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Political Agenda: Designing a Cognitive Game for Political Perspective Taking

Political Agenda: Designing a Cognitive Game for Political Perspective Taking
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Author(s): Matthew W. Easterday (School of Education & Social Policy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA), Yanna Krupnikov (Department of Political Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA), Colin Fitzpatrick (School of Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA), Salwa Barhumi (School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA) and Alexis Hope (Center for Civic Media, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA)
Copyright: 2017
Volume: 9
Issue: 3
Pages: 26
Source title: International Journal of Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations (IJGCMS)
Editor(s)-in-Chief: William Bart (University of Minnesota, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/IJGCMS.2017070102

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Abstract

Engaged citizenship requires understanding why different ideologies lead to different policy positions. However, we know little about political perspective taking. How might we use games to teach citizens political perspective taking? This paper describes a design research project to develop a cognitive game for political perspective taking. Study 1 describes a political perspective taking measure created through expert and novice task analysis. Study 2 surveyed 187 undergraduate students and found relatively poor political perspective taking ability. Study 3 tests an educational game for political perspective taking and found that the game was engaging but did not promote learning. Study 4 describes a technical exploration testing the feasibility of a cognitive game with intelligent tutoring for scaffolding complex reasoning on political perspectives. This work argues games can teach political perspective taking using: (a) moral foundations theory, (b) fantasy environments that ask players to predict policy positions, and (c) embedded intelligent tutors.

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