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Convergence at What Cost?: A Quasi Experiment of Professional Identity under the Bologna Process

Convergence at What Cost?: A Quasi Experiment of Professional Identity under the Bologna Process
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Author(s): Daniel A. Glaser-Segura (Texas A&M University – San Antonio, USA), Suzanne D. Mudge (Texas A&M University – San Antonio, USA), Constantin Bratianu (Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania) and Ivona Orzea (Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)
Copyright: 2014
Pages: 19
Source title: Handbook of Research on Trends in European Higher Education Convergence
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Alina Mihaela Dima (Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, Romania)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5998-8.ch010

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Abstract

The Bologna Process instituted measures promoting common curriculum throughout Europe with three-year standards established for Bachelor programs in economics, humanistic and positive sciences, and four-year standards for engineering sciences. Dramatic reductions were made to programs resulting in students moving into the workforce at a faster pace and with fewer academic credits. Questions existed as to whether three-year programs were sufficient for professional identity development. Professional identity, a system of attributes and values one has about self in relation to professional role, is essential for professional culture integration. This chapter employs a quasi-experimental design to compare professional identity development of Romanian business students ranging from first- through third-year using 2012 data and fourth-year students using 2007 data. Findings reveal professional identity within post-Bologna Process programs rose from first year to second but fell in the end-of-program third year. Data from pre-Bologna Process programs show higher measures of professional identity for end-of-program fourth-year students. Interpretations are provided and student workforce readiness discussed.

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