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Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Determining User Satisfaction from the Gaps in Skill Expectations Between IS Employees and their Managers

Determining User Satisfaction from the Gaps in Skill Expectations Between IS Employees and their Managers
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Author(s): James Jiang (University of Central Florida, USA), Gary Klein (University of Colorado, USA) and Eric T.G. Wang (National Central University, Taiwan)
Copyright: 2009
Pages: 12
Source title: Best Practices and Conceptual Innovations in Information Resources Management: Utilizing Technologies to Enable Global Progressions
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A. (Information Resources Management Association, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-128-5.ch016

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Abstract

The skills held by information system professionals clearly impact the outcome of a project. However, the perceptions of just what skills are expected of information systems (IS) employees have not been found to be a reliable predictor of eventual success in the literature. Though relationships to success have been identified, the results broadly reported in the literature are often ambiguous or conflicting, presenting difficulties in developing predictive models of success. We examine the perceptions of IS managers and IS employees for technology management, interpersonal, and business skills to determine if their perceptions can serve to predict user satisfaction. Simple gap measures are dismissed as inadequate because weights on the individual expectations are not equal and predictive properties low. Exploratory results from polynomial regression models indicate that the problems in defining a predictive model extend beyond the weighting difficulties, as results differ by each skill type. Compound this with inherent problems in the selection of a success measure, and we only begin to understand the complexities in the relationships that may be required in an adequate predictive model relating skills to success.

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