IRMA-International.org: Creator of Knowledge
Information Resources Management Association
Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Nominalizations in Requirements Engineering Natural Language Models

Nominalizations in Requirements Engineering Natural Language Models
View Sample PDF
Author(s): Claudia S. Litvak (Universidad Nacional de La Matanza, Argentina & Universidad Nacional del Oeste, Argentina), Graciela Dora Susana Hadad (Universidad Nacional del Oeste, Argentina & Universidad de Belgrano, Argentina) and Jorge Horacio Doorn (Universidad Nacional del Oeste, Argentina & Universidad Nacional de La Matanza, Argentina)
Copyright: 2018
Pages: 9
Source title: Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, Fourth Edition
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A. (Information Resources Management Association, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2255-3.ch445

Purchase

View Nominalizations in Requirements Engineering Natural Language Models on the publisher's website for pricing and purchasing information.

Abstract

It is a usual practice to use natural language in any document intended for clients and users in the requirements engineering process of a software development. This facilitates the comprehension of the requirements engineer's proposals to clients and users. However, natural language introduces some drawbacks, such as ambiguity and incompleteness, which attempt against a good comprehension of those documents. Glossaries help by reducing ambiguity, though they introduce their own linguistic weaknesses. The nominalization of verbs is one of them. There are sometimes appreciable differences between using a verb form or its nominal form, while in other cases they may be synonyms. Therefore, the requirements engineer must be aware of the precise meaning of each term used in the application domain, in order to correctly define them and properly use them in every document. In this chapter, guidelines about treatment of verb nominalization are given when constructing a specific glossary, called Language Extended Lexicon.

Related Content

Yair Wiseman. © 2021. 11 pages.
Mário Pereira Véstias. © 2021. 15 pages.
Mahfuzulhoq Chowdhury, Martin Maier. © 2021. 15 pages.
Gen'ichi Yasuda. © 2021. 12 pages.
Alba J. Jerónimo, María P. Barrera, Manuel F. Caro, Adán A. Gómez. © 2021. 19 pages.
Gregor Donaj, Mirjam Sepesy Maučec. © 2021. 14 pages.
Udit Singhania, B. K. Tripathy. © 2021. 11 pages.
Body Bottom