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Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Supporting Decision Making in Using Design Languages for Learning Designs and Learning Objects

Supporting Decision Making in Using Design Languages for Learning Designs and Learning Objects
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Author(s): Eddy Boot (TNO Defence, Security and Safety, The Netherlands), Luca Botturi (Università della Svizzera italianavia, Switzerland), Andrew S. Gibbons (Brigham Young University, USA) and Todd Stubbs (Brigham Young University, USA)
Copyright: 2009
Pages: 18
Source title: Handbook of Research on Learning Design and Learning Objects: Issues, Applications, and Technologies
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Lori Lockyer (University of Wollongong, Australia), Sue Bennett (University of Wollongong, Australia), Shirley Agostinho (University of Wollongong, Australia) and Barry Harper (University of Wollongong, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-861-1.ch042

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Abstract

In developing modern instructional software, learning designs are used to formalize descriptions of roles, activities, constraints, and several other instructional design aspects and learning objects are used to implement those learning designs in instructional software. Central in both constructs is the use of design languages to support structuring a design task and conceiving solutions. Due to a lack of standardized design languages that are shared between designers, producers, and other stakeholders, the application of learning designs and learning objects is often unsatisfactory for three reasons: (a) different instructional and technical structures are often not meaningfully organized; (b) different levels of detail are mixed together; and (c) different expressions are used in a nonstandardized manner. A decision model is introduced—the 3D-model—that supports better selection and application of design languages. Two studies show that the 3D-model contributes to a better information transition between instructional designers and software producers.

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