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“Talk to Me!”: Empowering Students With a Vision Impairment Through Audio E-Assessment Feedback

“Talk to Me!”: Empowering Students With a Vision Impairment Through Audio E-Assessment Feedback
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Author(s): Melissa Cain (Australian Catholic University, Australia) and Melissa Fanshawe (University of Southern Queensland, Australia)
Copyright: 2020
Pages: 19
Source title: Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment Practices in Higher Education
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Christopher Ewart Dann (University of Southern Queensland, Australia) and Shirley O'Neill (University of Southern Queensland, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-0426-0.ch001

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Abstract

As educators, we aim for students to seek, identify, and utilize a range of feedback to gain an understanding of their present performance in relation to learning goals, and ultimately to identify and use tools to close the gap between present and desired performance. We strive for all students to be their “own first assessors”—intelligent deciders—and develop the independence to self-assess the quality of their own work when they leave higher education institutions and enter the workforce. For students with a print disability such as vision impairment or blindness, traditional forms of feedback may not be successful in providing the information they need to close the gap. The most important issue for these students is access to feedback and agency in the feedback conversation. It is incumbent on higher education educators to find ways to provide equity of access to the provision and reception of feedback for all students. As such, this chapter explores ways for providing feedback to students with a vision impairment to ensure they are able to contextualize and utilize the feedback to improve learning outcomes. This is achieved by aligning the use of mobile technologies and audio feedback with the key principles of connectivism—autonomy, connectedness, diversity, and openness—to provide educators with recommendations.

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