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Advancing the Concepts & Practices of Information Resources Management in Modern Organizations

Using Mobile Devices to Facilitate Student Questioning in a Large Undergraduate Science Class

Using Mobile Devices to Facilitate Student Questioning in a Large Undergraduate Science Class
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Author(s): Helen Crompton (Old Dominion University, USA), Stephen R. Burgin (University of Arkansas, USA), Declan G. De Paor (Old Dominion University, USA) and Kristen Gregory (Old Dominion University, USA)
Copyright: 2020
Pages: 16
Source title: Mobile Devices in Education: Breakthroughs in Research and Practice
Source Author(s)/Editor(s): Information Resources Management Association (USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-1757-4.ch033

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Abstract

Asking scientific questions is the first practice of science and engineering listed in the Next Generation Science Standards. However, getting students to ask unsolicited questions in a large class can be difficult. In this qualitative study, undergraduate students sent SMS text messages to the instructor who received them on his mobile phone and via Google Glass. Using observations, coding of texts, and interviews, the researchers investigated the types and level of questions students asked and the perceptions of the instructor and TAs on how the messages were received. From the findings of this study, it is evident that students asked a wide variety of question types and levels. It would appear that important distinctions between voice and text questions are that: (a) a shy or insecure questioner can remain anonymous; (b) questions can be asked in an interactive, but not interruptive manner; (c) there is no time limit to answering questions; and (d) the record of questions on the instructor's phone can be used to guide revision of lecture notes for future semesters.

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